st1
Stockholm Virtual  Tour and  Travel  Guide
by   Ed Prifogle 
ed
 
 HOME 

  Featured Site-Virtual Sweden Full Page Panoramic Views
The virtual tour is best viewed using DSL or a Cable Broadband modem
To view the Virtual Tour, download the following:
  1. Quicktime
  2. FLASH
  3. IPIX
  4. Real Player
  5. Windows Media Player


VIRTUAL TOURS



smap
Click to Enlarge

Welcome to the Stockholm Virtual Tour:

Start by seeing  City Hall Panoramic views
Learn some basic Swedish Expressions
Interactive Maps
Movies-VR
Music
Newspaper and Magazines
Panoramic Views
Photos
Radio/TV
Slide Show
Travelago Video
Virtual Panoramic View of the Week
Virtual Tours
Visitors Reviews
Weather
Webcams
World Heritage Sites-Sweden

See this  Stockholm video 56k | 100k | 300k 
Warlking Tour One
Walking Tour Two
Orientation-See Map of Stockholm




CITY DESCRIPTION



Stockholm, a city of 1.4 million people, is built on 14 islands in Lake Mlaren, which marks the beginning of an archipelago of 24,000 islands, skerries, and islets stretching all the way to the Baltic Sea. A city of bridges and islands, towers and steeples, cobblestone squares and broad boulevards, Renaissance splendor and steel-and-glass skyscrapers, Stockholm also has access to nature just a short distance away. You can even go fishing in the downtown waterways, thanks to a long-ago decree signed by Queen Christina. Although the city was founded more than 7 centuries ago, it did not become the official capital of Sweden until the mid-17th century. Today it reigns over a modern welfare state. The medieval walls of the Old Town (Gamla Stan) no longer remain, but the old winding streets have been preserved


You can travel throughout Stockholm county by bus local train subway (t-bana and trams going from sing in the north to shamn south routes are divided into zones one ticket is valid for all types of public transportation same zone within 1 hour when stamped. There are ferries that cost $2.00 that connect to the old city. Taxis are very expensive. Standard tickets for Stockholm's excellent T-Banen subway, buses and streetcars cost $1. Specia discount tickets are available at all station ticket counters and newsstands. A 24-hour ticket valid with the city center costs $4. People under 18 years and over 65 pay half price. The Stockholm Card, priced at $20 for 1 day, $40 for 2 days and $60 for 3 days provides unlimited access to the transportsystem and extends discount privileges to over 50 museums, ferries and many fine attractions.

Stockholm is built on islands,  except for the modern centre (Norrmalm), focused on the ugly Sergels Torg. See this city guide.This business and shopping hub is linked by a network of subways to Centralstationen (central train station); the popular gardens of KungstrªdgŒrden lie just to the east. The subways link with the metro (tunnelbana or T) stations. The triangular island Stadsholmen and its neighbours accommodate Gamla Stan, separated from Norrmalm by the narrow channels of Norrstrºm near the royal palace, but connected by several bridges. To the west of this is Lake Mªlaren

Neiborhoods

As you'd expect of a city spread across 14 major islands in an archipelago, there are many neighborhoods, but those of concern to the average visitor lie in central Stockholm.

Gamla Stan (Old Town) -- The "cradle" of Stockholm, Gamla Stan lies at the entrance to Lake Mälaren on the Baltic. Its oldest city wall dates from the 13th century. The Old Town, along with the Vasa, is the most popular attraction in Stockholm. This is our favorite place to spend our nights in Stockholm. The hotels here are in general the most evocative of 18th-century Stockholm, built in romantic architectural styles. The downside of this area is that there are few hotels, and they tend to be expensive; there are, however, dozens of restaurants. Gamla Stan's major shopping street is Västerlånggatan, but many artisans' galleries and antiques stores abound on its small lanes. Its main square, and the heart of the ancient city, is Stortorget.

Norrmalm -- North of Gamla Stan, this is the cultural and commercial heart of modern Stockholm. Once it was a city suburb, but now it virtually is the city. Chances are your hotel will be in this district, as the area is generously endowed with hotels in all price ranges; it's also the most convenient location for most visits, as it encompasses the City Terminal and the Central Station. Hotels here are not the most romantic in town, but they're generally modern, up-to-date, and well run.

The most famous park in Stockholm, Kungsträdgården (King's Garden), also is in Norrmalm. In summer, this park is a major rendezvous point. Norrmalm also embraces the important squares of Sergels Torg and Hötorget, the latter a modern shopping complex. Norrmalm's major pedestrian shopping street is Drottninggatan, which starts at the bridge to the Old Town.

Vasastaden -- As Norrmalm expanded northward, the new district of Vasastaden was created. It's split by a trio of main arteries: St. Eriksgatan, Sveavägen, and Odengatan. The area around St. Eriksplan is called "the Off-Broadway of Stockholm" because it has so many theaters. Increasingly, this district has attracted fashionable restaurants and bars and has become a popular residential area for young Stockholmers who work in fields such as journalism, television, and advertising.

Vasastaden is slightly more removed from the scene of the action, but it's still a good bet for hotels. In New York City terms, Norrmalm would be like staying in the Times Square area, whereas Vasastaden would be equivalent to staying in the neighborhood of 60th or 70th Street. Hotels in Vasastaden come in a wide range of price categories.

 
CITY DESCRIPTION (continued)

Kungsholmen -- Once known as "Grey Friars Farm," Kungsholmen (King's Island), to the west of Gamla Stan, is the site of City Hall. Established by Charles XI in the 17th century as a zone for industry and artisans, the island now has been gentrified. One of its major arteries is Fleminggatan. Along Norrmälarstand, old Baltic cutters tie up to the banks. Stockholm's newspapers' headquarters are at Marieberg on the southwestern tip of the island.

Södermalm -- South of Gamla Stan, Södermalm (where Greta Garbo was born) is the largest and most populated district of Stockholm. Once synonymous with poverty, today this working-class area is becoming more fashionable, especially with artists, writers, and young people. If you don't come here to stay in one of the moderately priced hotels or to dine in one of its restaurants, you might want to take the Katarina elevator, at Södermalmstorg, Slussen, for a good view of Stockholm and its harbor. Admission is 10SEK ($1.05), free for ages 6 and under.

Östermalm -- In central Stockholm, east of Birger Jarlsgatan, the main artery, lies Östermalm. In the Middle Ages, the royal family used to keep its horses, and even its armies, here. Today it's the site of the Army Museum. There are wide, straight streets, and it also is home to one of the city's biggest parks, Humlegården, dating from the 17th century.

This is another area of Stockholm that's a hotel district. Östermalm doesn't have quite the convenience of Norrmalm and Vasastaden, but it still is not so far removed from the action as to be called inconvenient. In summer, when visitors from all over the world are in town, this is a good place to hunt for a room. Because Norrmalm and Vasastaden are located close to the Central Station, hotels in those neighborhoods tend to fill up very quickly.

Djurgården -- To the east of Gamla Stan (Old Town) is Djurgården (Deer Park), a forested island in a lake that's the summer recreation area of Stockholm. Here you can visit the open-air folk museums of Skansen, the Vasa man-of-war, Gröna Lund's Tivoli (Stockholm's own version of the Tivoli), the Waldemarsudde estate and gardens of the "painting prince" Eugen, and the Nordic Museum. The fastest way to get here is over the bridge at Strandvägen/Narvavägen.

Skeppsholmen -- On its own little island, and reached by crossing Skeppsholmsbron, a bridge from the Blasieholmen district, Skeppsholmen is like a world apart from the rest of bustling Stockholm. Although it makes for a pleasant stroll, most people visit it to see the exhibits at the Moderna Museet. Skeppsholmen also is home of af Chapman, Sweden's most famous youth hostel, a gallant tall ship that, with its fully rigged masts, is a Stockholm landmark.




FAST FACTS

American Express -- For local 24-hour customer service call tel. 08/429-56-00.

Area Code -- The international country code for Sweden is 46; the city code for Stockholm is 08 (if you're calling Stockholm from abroad, drop the zero). You do not need to dial 8 within Stockholm; only if you're outside the city.

Babysitters -- Stockholm hotels maintain lists of competent babysitters. Nearly all of them speak English. There is no official agency; rather, it's a word-of-mouth system. Your hotel reception desk can assist you.

Bookstores -- For a good selection of English-language books, including maps and touring guides, try Akademibokhandeln, Mäster Samuelsgatan 32 (tel. 08/613-61-00), open Monday through Friday from 10am to 7pm, Saturday from 10am to 4pm, and Sunday from noon to 4pm.

Car Rentals -- In Stockholm, some of the big car rental companies include Avis, Ringvägen 90 (tel. 08/644-99-80) and Hertz, Vasagatan 24 (tel. 08/24-07-20).

Currency Exchange -- There's a currency exchange office, Forex, at the Central Station (tel. 08/411-67-34), open daily from 7am to 9pm. It's fully approved by both the Bank of Sweden and the Swedish tourist authorities, offers some of the best exchange rates in town, and takes some of the lowest commissions for cashing traveler's checks. Several other offices are scattered throughout the city.

Dentists -- Emergency dental treatment is offered at Sct. Eriks Hospital, Fleminggatan 22 (tel. 08/545-51-20), open daily from 8am to 5pm.

Doctors -- If you need 24-hour emergency medical care, check with Medical Care Information (tel. 08/672-10-00). There's also a private clinic, City Akuten, at Apelberg Sq. 481, 4th floor (tel. 08/412-29-61).

Drugstores -- A pharmacy that remains open 24 hours a day is C. W. Scheele, Klarabergsgatan 64 (tel. 08/454-81-00).

Emergencies -- Call tel. 112 for the police, ambulance service, or the fire department.

Eyeglasses The Nordiska Kompaniet, Hamngatan 18-20 (tel. 08/762-80-00), a leading Stockholm department store, has a registered optician on duty at its ground-floor service center. The optician performs vision tests, stocks a large selection of frames, and makes emergency repairs.

Hospitals -- Call Medical Care Information at tel. 08/320-100 and an English-speaking operator will inform you of the hospital closest to you 24 hours a day.

Internet Cafe -- One of the most central places for receiving e-mail or checking messages is Café Nine, Odengatan 44 (tel. 08/673-67-97; info@ninestudios.com). It charges only 1SEK (10¢) per minute, and is open Monday through Friday from 10am to 1am and Saturday and Sunday from 11am to 1am. T-Bana: Odenplan.

Laundry & Dry Cleaning City Kemtvatt, Drottningsholmsvägen 9 (tel. 08/654-95-34), does dry cleaning and also laundry by the kilo for same-day delivery if it's brought in before 10am. It's open Monday through Friday from 7am to 6pm and Saturday from 10am to 2pm. Note that the system of coin-operated launderettes is pretty much outmoded in Sweden. The cost for doing laundry is 55SEK ($5.85) per kilo (2.2 lb.). Your clothes will be neatly folded for you as part of the price.

Libraries The Stockholms Stadsbibliotek, Sveavägen 73 (tel. 08/508-31-00), is the biggest municipal library in Sweden, with 2.5 million books (many in English) and audiovisual materials. It also subscribes to 1,500 newspapers and periodicals (again, many in English). It's open Monday through Friday from 9am to 9pm, and Saturday from noon to 4pm.

Lost Property -- If you've lost something on the train, go to the Lost and Found office in the Central Station, lower concourse (tel. 08/762-25-50). The police also have such an office at the police station at Bergsgatan 39 (tel. 08/401-07-88). The Stockholm Transit Company (SL) keeps its recovered articles at the Rådmansgatan T-bana station (tel. 08/736-07-80), and Vaxholmsbolaget has one at Nybrokajen 2 (tel. 08/679-58-30).

Luggage Storage & Lockers -- Facilities are available at the Central Station on Vasagatan, lower concourse (tel. 08/762-25-50). Lockers also can be rented at the ferry stations at Värtan and Tegelvikshamnen, at the Viking Line terminal, and at the Central Station.

Photographic Needs -- Photo shops are plentiful in Stockholm. One of the most centrally located is the Kodak Image Center, at Hamngatan 16 (tel. 08/21-40-42). Open Monday through Friday from noon to 6pm, and Saturday from 10am to 2pm.

Police -- Call tel. 112 in an emergency.

Post Office -- The main post office is at Vasagatan 28-34 (tel. 08/781-20-00), open Monday through Friday from 8am to 6pm and Saturday from 9am to 1pm. If you want to pick up letters while you're abroad, they should be addressed to your name, c/o Post Restante, c/o Postens Huyudkontor (main post office), Vasagatan 28-34, S-10 430 Stockholm, Sweden.

Radio & TV -- Sweden has two TV channels and three national radio stations, plus a local station for Stockholm, broadcasting on 103.3 MHz (FM). Many hotels are equipped to receive English-language TV programs broadcast from England, and many of the more expensive hotels have 24-hour CNN news broadcasts in English.

Restrooms -- Public facilities are found in the Central Station, in all subway stations, and in department stores, as well as along some of the major streets, parks, and squares. In an emergency, you also can use the toilets in most hotels and restaurants, although generally they're reserved for patrons.

Shoe Repair -- In the basement of Nordiska Kompaniet, Hamngatan 18-20 (tel. 08/762-80-00), a leading Stockholm department store, there is a shoe repair place, which also may be able to repair broken luggage.

Telephone, Telex & Fax -- Instructions in English are posted in public phone boxes, which can be found on street corners. Very few phones in Sweden are coin operated; most require a phone card, which can be purchased at most newspaper stands and tobacco shops. You can send a telegram by phoning tel. 00-21 anytime.

Post offices throughout Stockholm now offer phone, fax, and telegram services. Of course, most guests ask their hotels to send a fax. All but the smallest boarding houses in Stockholm today have fax services.

Transit Information -- For information on all services, including buses and subways (T-bana), and suburban trains (pendeltåg), call tel. 08/600-10-00. Or, visit the SL Center, on the lower level of Sergels Torg. It provides information about transportation and also sells a map of the city's system, as well as tickets and special discount passes. Open in summer, Monday through Thursday from 9am to 6pm, Friday from 9am to 5:30pm, Saturday from 9am to 4pm, and Sunday from 10am to 3pm; the rest of the year, open only Monday through Friday.
TRAVEL LINKS
  1. Adult
  2. AIRLINES-SAS
  3. AIRPORTS
  4. AMUSEMENT PARKS
  5. ATM LOCATIONS
  6. AUTO RENTAL
  7. BOATS/CRUISES
  8. CITY GUIDE
  9. CITY SEARCH
  10. CLASSIFIED ADS
  11. CURRENCY EXCHANGE
  12. CUSTOMS
  13. CYBER CAFES
  14. DINING
  15. DISCOUNTS/TRAVEL
  16. DRIVING/ SIGNS
  17. DRUG STORES
  18. ENTERTAINMENT
  19. EVENTS
  20. FAST FACTS
  21. FOOD MARKETS
  22. FROMMERS
  23. HOSTELS
  24. HOTELS
  25. LIMO RENTAL
  26. MAPS
  27. MEDICAL RESOURCES
  28. MONUMENTS/PARKS
  29. MUSEUMS
  30. NEWSPAPERS
  31. NIGHTLIFE
  32. OFFICIAL CITY SITE
  33. PHONE NUMBERS
  34. PHOTOS
  35. POLICE, FIRE
  36. SHOPPING
  37. SPAS/MASSAGE
  38. SPORTS
  39. SUBWAY
  40. TAXIS
  41. TOURS/ TOUR GUIDES
  42. TOURIST BUREAU
  43. TRANSPORTATION
  44. TRAVEL MAGAZINE
  45. US CONSULATE
  46. VIRTUAL TOUR SITE
  47. WEATHER
  48. WEB CAMS
  49. ZOOS
  50. RELATED LINKS
  51. SWEDEN TRAVEL GUIDE|
  52. SWEDISH ROYAL CASTLE 
  53. TRAINS AND BUSES
  54. MILITARY TRAVELERS



.